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Fixed penalty notices

How to pay fines for abandoning a vehicle, dog fouling/control offence, fly-posting, fly-tipping, littering, repairing or selling vehicles on the highway and not producing a waste carrier's licence or a waste transfer note.

How much is a fixed penalty notice?

Fixed penalty notices are issued for a variety of offences and the amount varies depending on the offence. The offences, along with the amounts, are:

 

Fixed penalty notice
Type of offence  Fine payable
Abandoning a vehicle £200
Dog fouling/control offence £75
Failing to produce a waste carrier's licence £300
Failing to produce a waste transfer note £300
Fly-posting £75
Fly-tipping £400 (£300 if paid within 10 days) 
Littering £75
Repairing vehicles on the highway £100
Selling vehicles on the highway £100
Read more about abandoning a vehicle,  dog control  fly-posting, fly-tipping, littering, repairing or selling vehicles on the highway and being prosecuted for failing to produce a waste carrier's licence or waste transfer notes.

How can I pay a fixed penalty notice?

There are a number of ways you can pay a fixed penalty notice:

Online

You can pay your fixed penalty notice online using a debit or credit card:  

Pay your fixed penalty notice online 

By post

Payment can also be made by post by completing part 2 of the penalty notice and returning it, along with a cheque/postal order made payable to 'East Riding of Yorkshire Council' to:

East Riding of Yorkshire Council
Collection services
PO Box 83
Cross Street
Beverley
HU17 9YR

In person

If you prefer to pay in person you can do so at any of the council’s customer service centres. You will need the fixed penalty ticket number and can pay by cash or any of the payment methods mentioned above. Find your local customer service centre.

What is the timescale for paying a fixed penalty notice?

You have 14 days.  If you pay the fixed penalty notice within this time you shall not be convicted of the offence.  

What happens if I fail to pay a fixed penalty notice?

Failure to pay may result in prosecution through the courts which, if successful, will result in a criminal record for the offence.